‘You’ll never walk alone’, history of a club in a song

Liverpool was born in 1892, as a split from Everton, after disagreements between the Board of Directors and the owner of the Anfield stadium, Jon Houlding. Despite the uncertainty, as the song says, they kept their heads high and moved forward. In his first season he played and won a regional competition. In 1892-1893 it was included in the Second Division and the following season it was proclaimed champion of that category and played for the first time in the First Division.

However, in these beginnings it took time to consolidate in the highest category and alternated promotions and relegations until 1904-1905. From that season, it was consolidated for fifty years in the First Division, although in 1954-55 it went down to Second Division. It took eight seasons to get promoted again, but after the 1961-1962 campaign, the takeoff of a team that has become one of the most popular in English football began.

It has been in the First Division for 60 uninterrupted seasons, renamed the Premier League in 1992, and in these six decades it has also won numerous international titles: six Champions League, formerly known as the European Cup, three Europa Leagues, the former UEFA Cup, four European Super Cups and a Club World Cup. His extensive palamarés is a clear example of the golden sky that Liverpool has managed to reach in its history.

Domestically, since the 1961-62 season they have won 14 of their 19 First Division championships, now known as the Premier League.

The Liverpool fans have also been the protagonist of dramatic moments, two milestones stand out above all: The Heysel tragedy and the Hillsborough tragedy. Without a doubt, the shaken and beaten dreams that You’ll never walk alone sings. Precisely this song was composed by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein for the musical Carousel, premiered at the Majestic Theater on April 19, 1945. In said work, You’ll never walk alone is sung by one of the protagonists, after a moment tragic. A hymn for a crowd that has witnessed and been the protagonist of two dramatic moments in the history of football and that is now sung by numerous clubs around the world.

The Heysel tragedy happened on May 29, 1985. An avalanche of fans in the run-up to the European Cup final, caused by an incident between Liverpool Hooligans and a group of Juventus fans, led to the death of 39 fans, mostly Italians, and 600 injured of varying degrees. This drama led to the expulsion of English teams for several seasons from continental competitions.

Four years later, at Hillsborough Stadium, 97 people died, mostly fans. networks after an avalanche that caused the crushing of the fans against the fences of the field. The event occurred during a match between Liverpool and Nothingham Forest. On this occasion, the subsequent investigation determined that the causes had not been as in Heysel, incidents between hobbies, but the excess capacity and the poor condition of the Sheffield field.



The fans of

Liverpool await

the doors of

stadium.

With the crowd outside, the police order door C to open.

Bypassing the use of turnstiles that allows moderate access

The Lepping Lane end of the land did not have a valid security certificate,

not updated since 1979

Fans run to pens three and four already full

97 people perished and 766 were

wounded

Some managed to save themselves being helped

to climb to the upper steps

The steel perimeter fence finished in

barbed tip prevented escape

The fans of

Liverpool await

the doors of

stadium.

With the crowd outside, the police order door C to open.

Bypassing the use of turnstiles that allows moderate access

The Lepping Lane end of the land did not have a valid security certificate,

not updated since 1979

Fans run to pens three and four already full

Hundreds escape through the gate onto the pitch

97 people perished and 766 were

wounded

Some managed to save themselves being helped

to climb to the upper steps

The steel perimeter fence finished in

barbed tip prevented escape

Liverpool fans await

at the gates of the stadium.

With the crowd outside the police

commands door C to open.

Avoiding the use of lathes that

allow moderate access

The Lepping Lane end of the land is not

had a valid security certificate,

not updated since 1979

The fans run to the

pens three and four already full

Hundreds escape through the door

to the field of play

97 people perished and 766 were

wounded

Some managed to save themselves being helped

to climb to the upper steps

The steel perimeter fence finished in

barbed tip prevented escape

Throughout its more than 130 years of history, great players have played in its ranks and have always noted the unconditional support of the fans, as the anthem says. As shown by these five that have managed to mark a milestone in network history. Although they were not the only ones.

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