The IPCC interactive atlas will make it possible to observe the impacts of climate change by region

On August 9, the sixth report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was published, in which experts announced that the observed changes in the climate are unprecedented and are closely linked to human activity. He also highlighted that the climate crisis is already affecting different regions of the world through different combinations of extreme events, such as heat waves, heavy rains, drought, ice loss, etc. These changes are expected to be generalized from the 2 ºC increase in global average temperature.

On the same day, the test version of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Interactive Atlas was presented. Now, after two months, show the final version, which has been corrected and updated with data from the Summary for Policy Makers.

The observed changes in climate are unprecedented and are closely linked to human activity

The presentation of the tool was attended by the Vice President and Minister of Ecological Transition and Demographic Challenge Teresa Ribera and the Minister of Science and Innovation, Diana Morant, the President of the CSIC, Rosa Menéndez, and the Vice-Dean of Research and Scientific Policy of the University of Cantabria, Luigi Dell’Olio. IPCC President Hoesung Lee and IPCC Secretary General Abdalah Mokssit also spoke remotely.

“You need a good knowledge base to make complex decisions. So this is an extraordinarily powerful tool. The interactive atlas allows for a better understanding of the analysis of the impacts of climate change, making the different plausible scenarios visible, thus making the best decisions and minimizing risks and costs. Furthermore, it allows us to increase the sensitivity and knowledge of all citizens so that they understand the measures that have to be taken to face the climate emergency”, said the vice president this morning.

A powerful strategic tool

O IPCC Interactive Atlas, developed by researchers from the Superior Council for Scientific Research (CSIC) and technology-based company Predictia, provides access to regional information and analyzes the main findings of the report to help implement future climate change policies.

This platform, with free and online access, allows anyone to observe the effects of climate change in different areas of the planet, as well as the different scenarios foreseen as greenhouse gas emissions increase, continue or are minimized.

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This free online tool allows anyone to observe the effects of climate change in different areas of the planet

This atlas meant a “qualitative leap” in Spain’s participation in the IPCC, becoming the fourth data distribution center, together with the United States, Germany and the United Kingdom, responsible for its maintenance and updating, according to Ribera.

The interactive atlas includes two components: the regional information (which provides access to climate change data from the main sets of numbers used in the report) and the regional synthesis (which summarizes and synthesizes the main findings of the assessment report. Regional climate change for different types of phenomena: heat, drought, sea level…).

All this means that this instrument, whose development was led by José Manuel Gutiérrez, researcher at the Institute of Physics of Cantabria (IFCA), a joint center of the CSIC and the University of Cantabria, and which had the participation of 20 IFCA researchers and technicians and Predictia, not only support the chapters of the report, but also the summary for policymakers.

To do this, it divides the planet into 46 terrestrial and 12 oceanic zones, and establishes the predictable progression up to the year 2100 for different atmospheric phenomena such as ‘average, maximum and minimum’ temperatures, rains, snowstorms or winds; it also includes other variables such as the evolution of surface temperature and sea level rise.

Science, essential to combat the climate crisis

The Minister of Science and Innovation, Diana Morant, also highlighted that “global warming is scientific evidence and that, thanks to science, we can anticipate and provide answers that allow us to minimize the impacts of climate change”. According to Morant, “the climate crisis is humanity’s greatest challenge.”

Thanks to science, we can anticipate and provide answers that allow us to minimize the impacts of climate change

Diana Morant, Minister of Science and Innovation

The minister announced the specific tender for R+D+ projects he would launch next November, worth 296 million euros; the second call against emissions, which will have a budget of more than 142 million euros, and Spain’s participation in the Copernicus Earth observation satellite program, whose effectiveness is said to be demonstrated in the eruption of the La Palma volcano.

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