Home World Julian Assange’s brother says he fears the death of Wikileaks founder

Julian Assange’s brother says he fears the death of Wikileaks founder

Julian Assange’s brother says he fears the death of Wikileaks founder

Julian Assange’s brother, Gabriel Shipton, said on Monday that he feared the WikiLeaks founder would die during the legal battle against his extradition from the United Kingdom to the United States. This film producer was then in front of the United Kingdom consulate in Manhattan, New York, in the company of about thirty people, including the American actress Susan Sarandon and the musician of the group Pink Floyd, Roger Waters.

Gabriel Shipton said he was “very worried about what hangs over Julian’s head and which only increases the pressure”. “We live in fear that he will not hold up or that he will die altogether during this judicial extradition process,” he said.

Victim of a “micro stroke” in prison

This is not the first time that Gabriel Shipton has been alarmed by the state of health of his 50-year-old brother. Julian Assange’s fiancée, Stella Moris, revealed to the British newspaper on Sunday Mail on Sunday that he had suffered at the end of October from a “micro stroke” in prison.

The Australian has been held in a high security prison near London since his arrest by British police in April 2019 after spending seven years in seclusion at the London Embassy in Ecuador where he took refuge while he was out on bail.

Appeal to the Supreme Court against extradition

Relatives and supporters of the founder of WikiLeaks were protesting after a major victory on Friday for the United States in their battle to obtain the extradition of the founder of WikiLeaks, the British High Court overturning a first instance decision which opposed it. Julian Assange intends, however, to appeal to the Supreme Court.

The United States accuses him of having disseminated, as of 2010, more than 700,000 classified documents on American military and diplomatic activities, in particular in Iraq and Afghanistan. Prosecuted in particular for espionage, he faces up to 175 years in prison in a case which, according to his supporters, represents an extremely serious attack on press freedom.

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