British driver Lewis Hamilton, seven-time Formula One champion, spoke out against the International Automobile Federation’s (FIA) rules on body piercing by showing up to Friday practice for the Miami Grand Prix wearing all his jewelry. that he was able to put on and suggested that he is willing to not run because of the measures.

Hamilton arrived at the paddock in a denim outfit with several open buttons on his long-sleeved shirt that showed at least four stacked necklaces. Hamilton later appeared in his Mercedes jersey sporting at least three watches and four rings on each hand. He also has earrings and a nose piercing.

“I couldn’t wear any more jewelry today,” said the seven-time world champion.

The FIA ​​on Thursday tightened its ban on non-regulatory underwear and body piercings as new race director Niels Wittich issued a bulletin including the rule as part of official scrutiny, meaning such options are subject to review. by race officials.

Four-time champion Sebastian Vettel felt the FIA ​​was being petty and wondered if the rule was specific to Hamilton.

“I think it’s a bit unnecessary to blow this up and it’s probably at this stage more of a personal thing, I feel like this is aimed at Lewis in a particular way,” Vettel stressed. “In a way, there is a safety concern, obviously if you have stuff and the car catches fire. To a certain degree, there is personal freedom and we are old enough to make our own decisions.”

Hamilton said when driving the car “I only have my earrings and my nose piercing, which I can’t take off.”

Hamilton said he sent a message to new FIA president Mohammed Ben Sulayem before arriving at the track, saying the jewelery discussion is nonsense and “I don’t want to fight you guys, ever”. But he, too, seemed prepared to stand his ground.

Formula One’s governing body explained that drivers may be subject to pre-competition checks because “wearing jewelry under required fire-retardant clothing may reduce the protection provided by this equipment.”

“Metallic objects, such as jewelery in contact with the skin, may reduce protection against heat transmission and thus may increase the risk of burn injuries in the event of a fire,” the FIA ​​wrote. “The use of jewelery during competition can hinder both medical interventions and subsequent diagnosis and treatment, if necessary after an accident.”

The FIA ​​indicated that jewelry can get caught during the emergency removal of a car and can also complicate or delay the medical plan.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here